SOUTHBOUND AND DOWN – Starburst Magazine

SOUTHBOUND AND DOWN - Starburst Magazine

SOUTHBOUND AND DOWN - Starburst Magazine

Anthology films are nothing new to horror cinema. The story collection format has been a hallmark of the genre, going all the way back to Paul Leni’s 1924 silent film, Waxworks. Leni’s film helped set the template for what viewers have come to expect from the horror anthology: a framing device helps set up the & Continued

Source: www.starburstmagazine.com/features/southbound-and-down

Friday Double Feature: Home Is Where the Haunt Is

Friday Double Feature: Home Is Where the Haunt Is

Friday Double Feature: Home Is Where the Haunt Is

Peter Jackson’s 1996 ghost story, The Frighteners, was the director’s first big Hollywood production. It didn’t do so hot, making just a little bit above its $26 million budget. Given the fact that the film’s star, Michael J. Fox, would make his triumphant return to the small screen just two months

Source: www.cinepunx.com/Writing/friday-double-feature-home-is-where-the-haunt-is/

Friday Double Feature: Madness By the Water

Friday Double Feature: Madness By the Water

Friday Double Feature: Madness By the Water

I have a weird relationship with the 1962 film Carnival of Souls. Part of the film was shot in Lawrence, Kansas, where I live. It was the director Herk Harvey’s only feature film, although he made many films for the industrial movie company Centron Corporation. The movie is a certifiable classic,

Source: www.cinepunx.com/Writing/friday-double-feature-madness-by-the-water

Friday Double Feature: Past & Present Tense

Friday Double Feature: Past & Present Tense

Friday Double Feature: Past & Present Tense

In his review for David Robert Mitchell’s 2014 film It Follows, The Wall Street Journal’s Joe Morgenstern referred to the film as “a vivid example of musically transmitted anxiety.” Thanks to the score by composer and musician Disasterpeace, the film is a ridiculously tense piece of horror. Watching

Source: www.cinepunx.com/Writing/friday-double-feature-past-present-tense/

Friday Double Feature: Madness By the Water

Friday Double Feature: Madness By the Water

Friday Double Feature: Madness By the Water

I have a weird relationship with the 1962 film Carnival of Souls. Part of the film was shot in Lawrence, Kansas, where I live. It was the director Herk Harvey’s only feature film, although he made many films for the industrial movie company Centron Corporation. The movie is a certifiable classic,

Source: www.cinepunx.com/Writing/friday-double-feature-madness-by-the-water/

Films from the Void: OGROFF

Films from the Void: OGROFF

FILMS FROM THE VOID is a journey through junk bins, late night revivals, under seen recesses and reject piles as we try to find forgotten gems and lesser known classics. Join us as we lose our minds sorting through the strange, the sleazy, the sincere and the slop from the past and try to make sense

Source: www.cinepunx.com/Writing/films-from-the-void-ogroff/

Review of ‘Bornless Ones’ at We Are Indie Horror

bornless ones
Produced by Black Drone Media and distributed by Uncork’d Entertainment, Bornless Ones is a cabin in the woods film, strongly influenced by The Evil Dead. Looking at the plot outline for Alexander Babaev’s film, viewers familiar with the genre will know exactly what they’re in for when viewing the movie.
Read the full review at We Are Indie Horror. Published 1/25/17

Interview with mc chris in the Pitch

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MC Chris has blown past the nerdcore label to become one of the most interesting minds in music. Sure, he could rock the mic for the comics-convention set indefinitely, but he clearly has a broader audience in mind. His latest, MC Chris Is Dreaming, concludes a kind of trilogy with an ambitious set centered on dreams and A Nightmare on Elm Street. It’s one of the rare hip-hop records on which the skits generate real excitement.
Read the full interview at the Pitch. Published 11/9/16

Review of short film ‘Wink’ at We Are Indie Horror

wink-header
Horror short, Wink, from Space Oddity Films, is an adorable three minutes of terror and violence. The film company makes films which “explore technology’s impact on culture and how that relationship will shape our future,” and a horror short featuring a murderous emoji definitely fits that outline perfectly.
Read the full review and watch the short at We Are Indie Horror. Published 10/27/16

Halloween Horror Marathon: Pumpkinhead

poster - PumpkinheadAn unjustly overlooked classic. A strange film that manages to be a creature feature, revenge flick, and supernatural horror picture all in one. My mom's favorite horror movie. These are all apt descriptions for Pumpkinhead, Stan Winston's 1988 movie starring Lance Henrickson. It's funny -- I know I saw this movie over and over when I was younger, but I might as well have never seen it, for as vague as the plot was in my memory. I don't remember it being as hallucinatory and freaky-looking as it is. There are angles and elements of Pumpkinhead's shooting that make it look like Sam Raimi had control of the camera. They contrast nicely with the almost pastoral scenes early on, before everything goes violent and revenge-y. In addition to the crazy camera movement and light streaming through backlit fog for its nighttime shots, Pumpkinhead looks like Texas Chainsaw Massacre during its daylight scenes. I watched this on a full-screen, untouched DVD from 2000, and it still managed to look frickin' great, despite the fact that Scream Factory put out a pretty excellent reissue of this on Blu-ray earlier this year. Honestly, though, the grainy, slightly blown-out look of the release I have only lent to the terrifying, awful aspect of everything. In terms of pacing, it's more early '70s than late '80s. You've got to be patient with this one. Pumpkinhead's slow build of southern gothic horror to an all out slaughter means that, while there's a good tease in the first scene to get your blood pumping, it's not until nearly halfway through that things get going. pumpkinhead This being a Stan Winston film, the creature effects are unsurprisingly amazing. It's a great looking film, even if it's pretty terribly acted, with the exception of Henrickson. Granted, he's just doing the quietly tough thing he does in everything, but it's especially suited to this picture. The creature is like a backwoods Giger creation. I can see how there were three sequels: the premise of Pumpkinhead as some kind of avenging reaver makes this an open-ended franchise of infinite possibilities. Why there were, however, I don't know. It's not particularly exciting unless you get an emotional resonance in the revenge, and killing a kid at the start of every picture will endear you to no-one. Still, despite all the striking parts about how it looks, and the delightful way in which the film brings a sort of pastoral British horror (a la The Wicker Man) to the American south, and the ways in which its pacing mirrors '70s horror, the plot's pure '80s horror, with the obnoxious young people in a convertible being punished. While being a fun romp, Pumpkinhead is ultimately just another movie which proves the horror movie rule: young city folk ought not be jerks in the country, or they will die terrible, violently bloody deaths. It's almost to the point nowadays that, should I see a nice sports car loaded with 20-somethings, I wonder who's going to be the first one to go, and how it'll happen. [embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PXlcm1el1D0[/embed]