Four new Slovenly singles from The Anomalys, PUFF!, Thee MVPs, and Useless Eaters

Posted in garage rock, punk, reviews, upcoming release, vinyl on June 11th, 2014 by Nick – 1 Comment

Three upcoming singles from Slovenly Records, as well as one (PUFF!) on their new imprint, Mondo Mongo. These all came into my inbox at the same time, so they’re all getting reviewed simultaneously. Each review was limited to a certain amount of space, and I kept to that, in the interest of brevity.

THE ANOMALYS -Deadline Blues- EP - coverThe Anomalys“Deadline Blues” b/w “No More!”

Ignore the a-side, which is pretty rote, even though there’s a nice reverb on the guitar tone. The vocals are so high up in the mix as to irritate, especially given the tone-deaf delivery. The crazed drumming and insistent background vocals on “No More!” make it the far more interesting track on here. It’s frantic and the surf bridge makes it completely danceable. You can freak the fuck out on that one.
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Gareth Murphy’s “Cowboys and Indies” provides an excellent record industry overview

Posted in books, reviews on June 10th, 2014 by Nick – 1 Comment

book cover - cowboys and indiesIn Gareth Murphy‘s new book for Thomas Dunne Books, Cowboys and Indies: The Epic History of the Record Industry, you get exactly what the title tells you. It’s certainly epic, going all the way back to the start of recorded sound, and documenting every technological, genre, and business change along the way.

Murphy’s writing demonstrates an obvious excitement regarding his topic, especially in the book’s early chapters, wherein there are new discoveries — wax cylinders! shellac discs! — nearly every few pages. The only issue is that, in trying to incorporate everything, details are given short shrift. Cowboys and Indies covers excellently the development of the technology of recorded sound, but misses out on how that actually changed the already-extant music industry of big bands (for an in-depth analysis of that, check out Elijah Wald’s How the Beatles Destroyed Rock ā€™nā€™ Roll).
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Madrid’s The Parrots on their upcoming single for Bachelor Records

Posted in garage rock, interview, streaming audio / video, video, vinyl on June 9th, 2014 by Nick – 2 Comments

parrots
Hailing all the way from sunny Spain, Madrid’s The Parrots rock a fresh take on garage rock, imbuing the genre with a woozy, surfy vibe. They’ve a new single out on Austria’s Bachelor Records on June 24, but they’ve shared the a-side, “Loving You Is Hard,” online for everyone to check out. We enjoyed it so much, we got the band to answer a few questions for us via e-mail.
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Vacation Club, “Heaven Is Too High” LP

Posted in garage rock, pop on June 4th, 2014 by Nick – 1 Comment

cover - vacation club heaven is too highThe first full-length from Indiana’s Vacation Club, Heaven Is Too High, took a couple listens to really work its way into rotation. Samuel James‘ vocals are an acquired taste — they’re high, they’re snotty, and they’re fairly monotonic.

It took picking the LP up after a little time away from it, putting it on the turntable, and hearing the opening strains of “Gas Station” to get what Vacation Club’s doing — this is a trimmed-down, lo-fi version of something like the Sweet or Slade.
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Night Birds, “Monster Surf” 7-inch

Posted in mp3 on June 3rd, 2014 by Nick – 3 Comments

cover - night birds monster surfCan Night Birds succeed without Brian Gorsegner‘s snotty vocals, which are so integral to the band’s sound? Is it possible to achieve that sense of horror and and b-movie grime without lyrics?

Shit yeah, it is. Granted, Gorsegner has a hand in playing synths on the dystopic sci-fi cut, “Agent Zero,” but the rest of the band handily rocks it pure surf style for the other three cuts on this EP.

It’s a nice chance to really focus on the fact that PJ Russo‘s guitar work is just lovely. The interplay between Russo’s guitar and Joe Keller‘s bass is what really makes this EP. Granted, it doesn’t get exceptionally complex at any point, but the songs are catchy. The same goes for drummer Ryan McHale, who — while he isn’t really called to do much more than standard timing — hits the skins with enough heft to give these songs a tiki-torch nighttime dance party feel.
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Josh Berwanger, “Oh Bis!” 7-inch

Posted in garage rock, label, pop, reviews, streaming audio / video, vinyl on June 2nd, 2014 by Nick – 4 Comments

cover - berwanger too much rockKids! Kidskidskidskids! Guess what?

Josh Berwanger put out a new single! And it’s part of the too Much Rock single series! And it has a cover of the Jags’ “Back of My Hand” on the b-side! I literally responded to the initial news of this with a linked article on Facebook and something along the lines of “THE FUCKING JAGS?!?!”

But, really, everybody: I’m a huge fan of Josh berwanger as a musician and just a guy to chat with in general, and this might be my favorite thing he’s thus far done. “Oh Bis!” has been part of Bernwager’s live sets for a while now, and the fact that he uses the word “bozos” has always endeared the song to me.
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Bloodpheasant, “Traum” LP

Posted in hardcore, punk, reviews, vinyl on May 28th, 2014 by Nick – Be the first to comment

cover - bloodpheasant traumThe newest Tor Johnson Records release, Bloodpheasant‘s Traum, showed up a while back, and it took me nearly a week to get to listen to it. I’m usually prone to throwing whatever Paul’s sent in the mail straight onto the turntable after I get in the house, but somehow, this languished on my coffee table for the better part of six days.

The reason I say all of this is to emphasize how bummed I felt halfway through opening cut, “A Bird and Its Wings.” I could’ve listened to this all last week, but no — I had to do productive things instead of getting lost in this Rhode Island quartet’s twangy, apocalyptic doom.
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“Essential Ellen Willis” a varied, sprawling read

Posted in books, reviews on May 27th, 2014 by Nick – Be the first to comment

book cover - essential ellen willisThe Essential Ellen Willis, out now from University of Minnesota Press, collects a lifetime of Ellen Willis‘ work, looking to give a more nuanced and thorough view of her career and importance than was presented in her collection of music writing, Out of the Vinyl Deeps.

Now, important and thorough does not necessarily an interesting or involving read make. I found myself struggling and trudging through some pieces. Historical importance and documentary worth do not equal easy or entertaining reading, because anthologies are inherently exhausting.

They jump topics, tone varies, and just keeping one’s self temporally oriented can leave a head spinning. It requires a nimble mind to be able to read straight through without needing the occasional break. Despite loosely grouping essays together by topic — sex, drugs, et al — it’s a massive undertaking for even those short groups.
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James Fearnley’s “Here Comes Everybody” is an energetic, involving story of the accordionist’s days with the Pogues

Posted in books, punk, reviews on May 21st, 2014 by Nick – Be the first to comment

book cover - here comes everybodyIt’s always with fear and trepidation that I crack open a musician’s memoir. For every Keith Richards autobiography, there are several dozen tomes that collapse under the weight of their own self-import and overwrought prose.

James Fearnley‘s new book, Here Comes Everybody: The Story of the Pogues is as enrapturing as any I’ve read. It starts off shakily, discussing as it does Fearnley’s youth with a bit of a gloss to his upbringing.

After that, however, it’s a fascinating, rollicking series of stories. Fearnley’s time with Shane McGowan begins with the Nips, prior to the Pogues, and those stories are wonderful, giving a little-seen glimpse at the early days of McGowan’s infamous carousing.
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Watery Love, “Decorative Feeding” LP

Posted in garage rock, hardcore, punk, reviews on May 16th, 2014 by Nick – Be the first to comment

Watery Love‘s new album on In the Red, Decorative Feeding is blown the fuck out. It appropriately pegs the VU meters in the red for pretty much the entire duration of the LP.

Waterylove_jacketDecorative Feeding isn’t a subtle album. Vocals are hoarsely shouted, and declamed more than sang. The band rocks the same drum beat for most of the album, with Watery Love seeming like it’s about to fall apart at any given moment.

It’s a tenuous connection holding everything together — you wonder if the first few times this happened live, everyone in Watery Love just ended up sitting on the stage as feedback rolled out of amplifiers and somebody screamed into a microphone. It’s a little better on the second side, when the drone gives up to some thrashed-out riffs, but this is an intensely anxious album.
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