Peter Frampton talks about his (screen) legacy ahead of his Tuesday show at Starlight

Peter Frampton talks about his (screen) legacy ahead of his Tuesday show at Starlight

Peter FramptonJohn LillGuitar god and '70s rock icon Peter Frampton has been making music for decades, so there's no end to the stories the man could tell...

Source: www.pitch.com/music/blog/20867684/peter-frampton-talks-about-his-screen-legacy-ahead-of-his-tuesday-show-at-starlight

Review of ‘Bornless Ones’ at We Are Indie Horror

bornless ones
Produced by Black Drone Media and distributed by Uncork’d Entertainment, Bornless Ones is a cabin in the woods film, strongly influenced by The Evil Dead. Looking at the plot outline for Alexander Babaev’s film, viewers familiar with the genre will know exactly what they’re in for when viewing the movie.
Read the full review at We Are Indie Horror. Published 1/25/17

An endorsement of Nazi punching at Cinepunx

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Like many folks, I woke up Friday morning feeling afraid and uncomfortable, uncertain as to what was going to happen to the United States. I knew of the many marches planned for that night and the next day, but by the time noon rolled around and the president-elect replace Barack Obama, I was fairly well sick with worry. So, as is my wont, I went to the bar near my house to watch Jeopardy and zone out. Jeopardy was pre-empted by the parade, so I got to watch a limp work its way down Pennsylvania Avenue while I drank cheap beer and tried to tamp down everything. By the time I got home and sat around watching Venture Bros DVDs, I was a morose, sad-sack guy. Then — then I saw a video that gave me hope. Self-described “alt-right” demagogue — in reality a white nationalist, racist, bigoted piece of human garbage — Richard Spencer was in the middle of an interview, and just as he began to explain the Pepe the Frog pin on his lapel, he got fucking cold-cocked.
Read the full op-ed at Cinepunx. Published 1/23/17

Interview with Joe Bob Briggs in the Pitch

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Movie critic Joe Bob Briggs is known for his reviews of drive-in movies, even if there aren't all that many drive-ins around these days. He's become something of a go-to guy for films with exploding heads, car chases, nudity, and all aspects of action, be it kung-fu, car-fu, or chainsaw-fu. While he was once best known for his hosting duties on The Movie Channel and TNT, introducing films as part of Joe Bob's Drive-In and MonsterVision, he's now an author of some repute, with the essential movie guides Profoundly Erotic: Sexy Movies that Changed History and Profoundly Disturbing: Shocking Movies that Changed History.
Read the full interview at the Pitch. Published 1/21/17

John Williams’ “Duel of the Fates” video at Cinepunx

star wars duel
The Phantom Menace was released the day I finished my sophomore year of college. Thanks to some amazing friends who sat in line for weeks, I was able to snag a ticket to the midnight screening in the biggest theater in Kansas City. I moved all of my stuff out of the dorms, drove it home, took it into my parents’ house, and then drove to sit in line for seven hours, in order to secure a seat. It’s weird to think about the fact that despite having watched all of the movies with my friends (including a Labor Day marathon a year or two prior, wherein we watched all the Special Editions when they were released on VHS), in addition to having friends from college get my ticket, I watched the movie essentially by myself. A sold-out theater, yes, but I sat by myself.
Read the From the Stereo to Your Screen column on John Williams and The Phantom Menace at Cinepunx. Published 11/18/16

The Clash at Demonhead’s “Black Sheep” video at Cinepunx

scott pilgrim - clash at demonhead o'malley

Despite the fact that I’d rabidly followed the Bryan Lee O’Malley graphic novel series on which it was based, I didn’t get to see Edgar Wright’s Scott Pilgrim vs. the World film when it was in theaters. Firstly, I think it ran for maybe two weeks in my town, and it was dead-smack in the middle of back-to-school season.

Given that at the time, I was raising two kids, finances and time were at a premium, and they never became available simultaneously. So, I waited four months for it to come out on video, and then promptly watched it every day for a week. This coincided with me downloading the soundtrack and listening to it every day at work for a week, as well.
Read the From the Stereo to Your Screen column on The Clash at Demonhead and Scott Pilgrim vs. the World at Cinepunx. Published 12/6/16

Rachel Sweet’s “Hairspray” video at Cinepunx

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Despite its many iterations — musical, movie musical, live televised musical — John Waters’ original version of Hairspray, released in 1988, remains the best. Now, I’m a fan of musicals, and I’ll admit the Tony-winning Broadway version is pretty damned solid, with opening number, “Good Morning Baltimore,” being the best of the bunch. I’ll even cut some slack to “You Can’t Stop the Beat,” despite it being almost insipidly cloying. That said, Waters’ film is just so perfectly bizarre and fun and joyous, with a perfect selection of Cameo Parkway R&B sides soundtracking everything. The plot, if you’ve never seen any of the various iterations, revolves around Baltimore teenager Tracy Turnblad getting on The Corny Collins Show, dancing, then becoming more racially aware, dancing, fighting for integration, and more dancing.
Read the From the Stereo to Your Screen column on Rachel Sweet and Hairspray at Cinepunx. Published 1/10/17

Review of It Watches at We Are Indie Horror

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The latest film from Uncork’d Entertainment comes from I.D. Entertainment. It Watches is directed by Dave Parker, best known for the “Sweet Tooth” installment of 2015’s horror anthology, Tales of Halloween. That opening salvo of the film was one of the anthology’s highlights, mixing strangeness, humor, and not a little gore into an effective mix. Given the director’s work in gory, effects-laden projects – such as The Dead Hate the Living! or The Hills Run Red – it isn’t without a little curiosity that one watches Parker’s newest film, with it’s rather more sedate and restrained concept.
Read the full review at We Are Indie Horror. Published 1/17/17